Does melatonin do anything at all? Placebo effect, perhaps?


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released information today about research on melatonin supplements. The research was conducted at the University of Alberta for the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative medicine. U of A researchers did a comprehensive review of all studies on the use of melatonin supplements to treat sleep disorders.

Click here to read the synopsis of what they found. Not looking so good for melatonin, me thinks!


Endogenous melatonin, cortisol, and b-endorphin levels after a marathon


Strenuous exercise increases plasma melatonin, cortisol, and ?-endorphin concentrations. Furthermore, a relationship between endogenous opioids and melatonin has been proposed. We measured plasma melatonin, cortisol, and ?-endorphin in 46 subjects before and after a 28.5-mile high altitude race. Thirteen of the subjects received the orally active opioid antagonist naltrexone immediately before the race. The mean plasma melatonin, cortisol, and ?-endorphin levels were higher after the race than before it; the melatonin results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay of 12 subjects. Naltrexone had no effect on the increase in any of the three hormones. (via.)

This study was briefly mentioned in “DMT: The Spirit Molecule.” I happened to run across it and thought I’d tuck it away on the blog in case it ever comes up again for some reason.


Helicobacter pylori bacteria linked with Parkinson’s (mice)


The bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers have been linked to Parkinson’s disease, according to researchers in the US.

Mice infected with Helicobacter pylori went onto develop Parkinson’s like symptoms.

The study, presented at a meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, argues that infection could play “a significant role”.

Read more at the BBC.